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Shelter is forced to lock Quilty the cat in ‘solitary confinement’ because he keeps FREEING cats | Daily Mail Online

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Shelter is forced to lock Quilty the cat in ‘solitary confinement’ because he keeps FREEING cats | Daily Mail Online

Shelter is forced to lock Quilty the cat in ‘solitary confinement’ because he keeps FREEING his fellow felines

He is a prolific offender and master escape artist who likes nothing more than to free his fellow detainees for riotous nocturnal adventures.

So his custodians were left with very little choice when, despite adding extra security measures to his room, he once again escaped.  

Quilty, the cat, has now been placed in ‘solitary confinement’ – and a video posted by the Friends for Life Animal Shelter in Houston shows he is not best pleased.       

‘Quilty’s review with the parole board was denied, so he released himself of his own recognizance,’ the shelter posted on its Facebook page.

‘He felt that confinement had nothing more to offer him. He has been returned to solitary.    

‘Quilty will not be contained. And he has no shame. 

‘His roommates missed him while he was banished to the lobby. They enjoyed their nighttime escapades around the shelter.’  

Quilty is always planning his next escape, with or without his feline friends at a Houston shelter

Quilty (right) has a knack for open doors and letting his fellow cats roam the halls of their shelter

‘The cat released himself FROM THE INTEGRATION KENNEL IN THE ROOM.’

But the animal shelter played off his rambunctious behavior on his bio page written as Quilty: ‘I do know that I like to open closed doors. When I see one it challenges me, and I work hard to get it open and I’m usually successful.’ 

The shelter clearing is embracing Quilty’s need to open doors, even staring an Instagram account for the six-year-old domestic short hair–  @freequilty, which refers to him as a ‘door ninja,’ and merchandising the cat brand.  

His activity, though, is not new to the fearless feline.

‘He used to let his dog sibling in the house at his old home,’ the shelter added on the Facebook page. 

Quilty has a reputation for being a handful to staffers at the Friends for Life Animal Shelter in Houston

A rare, quiet moment for Quilty, 6, who is called a ‘Door Ninja’  on a Instagram page for his ability to open doors and free cats at their animal shelter

The Friends for Life Animal Shelter in Houston said Quilty(above) is close to an adoption, despite his often rambunctious style

They say on his bio for families seeking to adopt Quilty that he is ‘a smart, energetic, laid back fella, but I can be a bit shy.’ 

He has a good rapport with pet dogs, but they caution, ‘I’m not sure about young children. I’ve never played with them before, so I don’t know if I like them.’ 

But there many who like the cat’s exploits, including those comments on the animal shelter’s Facebook post.

‘Actually, he kinda sounds like my cat!’ 

‘This whole post is amazing. To be entirely dramatic, I would die for Quilty.’ 

‘I love him so much.’

‘Someone PLEASE let that boy out he must be FREE.’

In a reply to a comment Wednesday, the animal shelter said Qulity is close to the ultimate release. 

‘We have a ton of applications on him, but think we might’ve found his potential forever home!’  

Shelter is forced to lock Quilty the cat in ‘solitary confinement’ because he keeps FREEING cats

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